Five Days

A while back I wrote a piece about how this domain had a high href rating of 29 but does not get any traffic from the search engines, it is now (thanks to my SEO skills) at a massive 40 but still does not get any traffic.

Of course skullduggery by my powerful enemies has always been expected and it is a full time job keeping the site online never mind getting noticed. The main problem is getting hosting from a company who can’t be nobbled by the combined economic might of Britain and the USA, but there is another problem called DNS or domain name system, which is like the phone book of the internet that converts your domain name to an IP address associated with your hosting. Problem is the system is as old as the internet itself and is not very secure. IE powerful people can send real visitors (or search engine bots) to a fake site, simply by changing the IP address. Nowadays you have a system called DNSSEC which encrypts the DNS in a similar way to SSL (green padlock) with a public and private key. Of course I have been using this system for a while with no benefits. Seems the problem is that the private key is stored on your hosting C Panel (Plesk, Cpanel, DirectAdmin) have all been tried. Clearly the American or Canadian owners of these panels have administrative access (and also GCHQ etc) . So with a lot of searching around I found a system that is more secure as it does not store the private key anywhere, instead it just lets me see it through a secure shell system. So I tried it out on a minor domain and it worked a treat, so I thought OK lets get political-prisoner secured with this DNSSEC system. My domain was registered at American company called Namecheap and by the time I went to secure it, they had switched off their DNSSEC system so I couldn’t get it secured, leaving me no options but to transfer my domain to a different registrar hopefully not so close to the Yanky criminals. Soon as I initiated the transfer, they switched the DNSSEC service back on knowing full well that I can’t make further adjustments to my domain while in transfer mode. In other words I can’t initiate DNSSEC until the domain moves to the new registrar, a process that takes on average five days. We shall see if that is true in my case or if Namecheap try to delay the transfer?